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King-Kong-1976

King Kong (1976)

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GROSS REVENUE:
$90,614,445 USD

GENRES:
Romance, Thriller, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Adventure

BUDGET:
$24 million USD

DVD RELEASE DATE:
November 22, 2005

RELEASE DATE:
December 17, 1976 -U.S.


PG-13 for violence and language

John Guillermin

Dino De Laurentiis

Federico De Laurentiis

Christian Ferry

Merian C. Cooper & Edgar Wallace (story)

James Ashmore Creelman & Ruth Rose (1933 screenplay)

Lorenzo Semple Jr.

John Barry

Richard H. Kline

Ralph E. Winters

Warner Bros.

United States

English

Biltmore Hotel - 506 S. Grand Avenue, Downtown, Los Angeles, California, USA

Downtown, Los Angeles, California, USA

Honopu Beach, Kaua'i, Hawaii, USA - Skull Island

Kaua'i, Hawaii, USA - Skull Island

Los Angeles, California, USA

Manhattan, New York City, N. Y, USA

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios - 10202 W. Washington Blvd., Culver City, California, USA – studio

Na Pali Coast, Kaua'i, Hawaii, USA - Skull Island

New York City, N. Y, USA

New York Public Library - Fifth Avenue & 42nd Street, Manhattan, New York City, N. Y., USA

Queensboro Bridge, Manhattan, New York City, N. Y, USA

San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, USA

World Trade Center Plaza, Manhattan, New York City, N. Y. USA

Did We Miss Any?

King Kong Lives

Academy Awards

1977 Won Special Achievement Award Carlo Rambaldi, Glen Robinson & Frank Van der Veer for visual effects

1977 Nominated Oscar Award Best Cinematography Richard H. Kline

1977 Nominated Oscar Award Best Sound Harry W. Tetrick, William L. McCaughey, Aaron Rochin & Jack Solomon

Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA

1977 Won Special Award

BAFTA Film Awards

1977 Nominated BAFTA Film Award Best Production Design / Art Direction Mario Chiari & Dale Hennesy

Golden Globes

1977 Won Golden Globe Best Acting Debut in a Motion Picture Female Jessica Lange

Golden Screen, Germany

1978 Won Golden Screen Award

Submit Awards



King Kong 1976 King Kong Holds Jessica Lange 1976 Jessica Lange Stars In King Kong 1976


Jeff Bridges
Jeff
Bridges
Jessica Lange
Jessica
Lange
Charles Grodin John Randolph Rene Auberjonois Julius Harris Jack O’Halloran Dennis Fimple Ed Lauter Jorge Moreno

This re-make of King Kong saw an oil company searching for black gold, the hottest commodity of the '70s and for Kong's demise, the twin towers of the World Trade Center replaced the Empire State Building in the original version.

The film took a tongue-in-cheek, campy attitude one minute, a serious one the next, making audiences uncertain as to the film's intent.

Instead of the miniature stop-motion animation invented by Willis O'Brien, this new Kong used a combination of effects to achieve what O'Brien had done on a tabletop back in the pioneering days of 1933. First there was makeup man Rick Baker in a monkey suit with five different facially expressive masks, depending on Kong's mood. Then there was a 40-foot-high mechanical ape weighing six-and-a-half tons, capable of wiggling his arm, rolling his neck, twitching his ears, rotating his hips, and smiling. There was also a hydraulically operated arm with a hand six feet across in which the gentle giant holds and caresses Ms. Lange. The genius behind this mechanical miracle was Carlo Rambaldi, who would go on to become one of the most sought-after effects men in Hollywood, later working on Close Encounters of the Third Kind and E.T.

Another remake was released in 2005 titled 'King Kong 2005'.

Employees of the Empire State Building expressed their displeasure at the producers' decision to stage the remake's climax at the World Trade Center by picketing the 102nd floor of the Empire State Building dressed in monkey suits.

The 40-foot Kong was constructed with a 3.5-ton aluminum frame, covered with rubber and 1,012 pounds of Argentinian horse tails, sewn into place individually. Its insides were comprised of 3,100 feet of hydraulic hose and 4,500 feet of electrical wiring. It was controlled by 20 operators and cost a total of $1.7 million.

The full-sized mechanical arms were suspended from a crane in order to extend and lift Jessica Lange 30 to 40 feet in the air.

Four ape suits were created and worn by Rick Baker and realistically depicted the appropriate
musculature beneath the fur through a special under-suit with silicone-filled muscles. The hands of the costume used animatronic extensions, again controlled by operators off set, so as to give Kong appropriately gorilla-like long limbs.

Federico De Laurentiis, son of Dino De Laurentiis and executive producer for the film, extensively photographed a gorilla named Bum at a local zoo, and the photos were used for the basis of Kong.

As both a personal thank-you to the crew and a promotional tool, Dino De Laurentiis had 500 polyresin and wood Kong maquettes created, costing him $200 each.

In a 2008 interview with David Letterman Meryl Streep revealed that she auditioned for the role of Dwan but was turned down by Dino De Laurentiis as being 'ugly'. He did this in Italian not knowing that Meryl Streep understood Italian.

Roman Polanski, Michael Winner, and Sam Peckinpah turned down the offer to direct.

Bo Derek and Britt Ekland turned down the role of Dwan.

Submit Interesting Facts

If they wanted to keep Kong on that side of the wall, why did they take the trouble to make such a big door?

Jack Prescott: Even an environmental rapist like you wouldn't be ass-hole enough to destroy a unique new species of animal….Fred Wilson: Bet me.

Dawn: Come on Kong forget about me. This things just never going to work, can’t you see?

Submit Quotes

The train is full of screaming people, but when Kong picks it up, it is empty. It is a miniature.

When Kong leaps from one World Trade Center tower to the other, wires can be seen holding him up.

Submit Goofs & Blunders

Sure, this King Kong remake is loaded with flaws, but, in many ways, they add to the campy charm. De Laurentiis' Kong may not be a grand, glorious modernization of a classic tale, but it's two-plus hours of big-scale, occasionally-foolish entertainment. Reviewed by: James Berardinelli of Reel Views.

The real auteurs of this "King Kong" are not the producers, the director or the writer, but Carlo Rambaldi, Glen Robinson and Rick Baker, who are credited with having been responsible for designing, constructing and engineering the mechanisms.Reviewed by: Vincent Canby of The New York Times.

Bad script and acting ruin a classic story. Parents need to know that kids will see some sexually-charged scenes and violence. Scantily clad natives thrust suggestively during a ritual. We get a fleeting glimpse of breasts. Kong's in love with his female hostage and, as hard as it is to believe, some of their scenes together are erotically charged. Kong tears the jaw off a fake-looking giant snake. The shootout finale goes overboard on squirting blood. Reviewed by: Common Sense Media.

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